Hunters “The Great Ole Nazi Cookout Of ’77”

I think I may have this show figured out now.

You know, with only two episodes left including this one.

I think the whole thing so far is really a battle for the soul of Jonah Heidelbaum.

I mean, sure, on the surface, there’s a Nazi plot to foil.  Poisoning corn syrup to kill inner city minorities is terrible and an evil that needs to be stopped.  No one in their right mind would argue that, and we do learn a bit more about other characters here.  Lonny had a father who didn’t believe in him, and his confidence needs a boost when he needs to go undercover.  Sister Harriet is working for a spy agency from the looks of things and not the Nazis, but she is a deepcover plant from the looks of things.  Roxy is back, worried about how she killed someone, and Joe is there to give her blunt advice that is perhaps not all that reassuring.

But the main character is and always has been Jonah, and while many times the show goes off onto their weird tangents, these tangents do serve a point in Jonah’s character development.  Jonah, when we first met him, was not the most assertive of fellows.  He was a massive geek who worked in a comic book store and sold weed.  He tried to stand up for himself, but he didn’t really know how to fight, and when he heard a strange man threatening his grandmother, he froze and she died.  Sure, he would have probably died if he hadn’t froze, but he still froze.  My guess is some of these over-the-top scenes, like the one that opened this episode explaining where Project Paperclip came from, are maybe Jonah’s mind figuring out how things work.

But look over how he’s changed since he met the Hunters.  He’s become a lot more violent, a lot more interested in vigilante justice, and a lot more angry.  He’s quick to volunteer for any undercover mission, doing so in a manner that may be impressing Joe.  But, ultimately, is this who Jonah should be?  Is spending time hunting monsters turning him into one?  How many of the Hunters are monsters?  Meyer certainly seems to be one.  Sister Harriet is no saint.  Joe is haunted by his actions, but at least he still has a conscience.  Lonny, Roxy, and the Markowitzes are a lot slower to pull triggers if they do at all.  They have varying levels of regrets.

But Meyer, the man Jonah believes is his grandfather, seems to be leading Jonah down this dark path as if this is the only way to deal with Nazis.  Granted, these are Nazis still doing evil, and a show like this probably wouldn’t suggest there is or should be another way, but at the same time, there are characters trying to push Jonah in the direction of his better angels before the boy goes too far.  His friends are looking for him, worried.  Agent Morris still believes in the law, and she not only manages to capture the rather pathetic Biff, figure out who beat her up, and a few other crucial details, she also manages to convince Jonah not to shoot a cornered Travis no matter how eugenics-enthusiastic the American Nazi got.

And though the Hunters destroyed the pathogen that was supposed to go into the corn syrup, cooking a lot of Nazis in the process as promised, Meyer took the Colonel and left, their car crashing en route to…wherever they were going.

I’m still not 100% sure what I think of this show, but at least I have an idea of where it may be going and why.

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: