Comic Review: 100 Bullets Deluxe Edition Book 3

I mentioned in yesterday’s review that I want to finish three series this calendar year, and the first may be the one I read a good portion of ages ago and only got back to finishing it recently.  Granted, I had to start from the beginning, but I don’t regret that got a second.

I’m referring to 100 Bullets, and I think the third of these Deluxe Editions represents how far I got the first time around.

Yeah, I’m not 100% when or how I quit getting the individual trades as they came out, but I think I got this far before with the big death at the end of this volume.  I won’t quite say who it is, but the previous volume showed the former Minutemen weren’t exactly invulnerable as the sociopathic Lono dispatched one without a second through, though he had no idea who he was killing at the time, and, in a nice twist, it was the one other Minuteman Lono actually liked and he isn’t happy to learn what he did.

That said, much of this collection seems to focus on former Minuteman Wylie Time as he starts to remember, well, everything, like why he hates Shepherd.  True, the book opens with a series of one-off issues updating the lives of many of the characters that appeared in the series so far such as Dizzy, Cole, and Agent Graves, the majority of the issues seemed to be about Wylie as he gradually remembered his life, and Wylie’s life is tragic in the past and the present, so it’s easy to see why he may not want to remember much of anything.

And when we aren’t looking in on Wylie, we have Lono meeting up with Loop Hughes in prison, and if there’s one person Loop Hughes wants to avoid at all costs, it’s Lono.  And then, there’s heroin-addicted Jack doing something involving the sort of stuff that may very well have been happening behind the scenes on Tiger King.

Does all this go somewhere?  Presumably.  The series ran for 100 issues, and this volume goes well past the halfway point.  I do see the series headed in the general direction of Graves having a showdown with the House of Medici in the Trust, and the 50th issue gave what looked like an origin story for both the Trust and the Minutemen.  Surprisingly with a name like that, the group pre-dates the American Revolution.

I do like Brian Azzarello’s noir-ish writing style and Eduardo Risso’s art still works well for the tone of this series, and I am sure it’s all going somewhere, but I’m not completely sure I am enjoying the series as much as I used to.  There are a lot of balls in the air, and not as many issues left after this book to tie them all up.  I do have the next Deluxe Edition in my possession already, so I’m sure I’ll be getting to it fairly soon.

8.5 out of 10 tiger bites.

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: