Comic Review: Star Wars The Screaming Citadel

My brother told me my nephew really likes the Star Wars comics I pass along to them, so I picked up a few trades to read and pass along before I see them again for Christmas.  As such, well, expect a few Star Wars reviews over the next week or so.

First up, a crossover with the main series and the Doctor Aphra spin-off called The Screaming Citadel.

Luke Skywalker is a bit down due to a distinct lack of Jedi Knights to train him in the ways of the Force.  While moping in a bar, he’s approached by Doctor Aphra.  She has the consciousness of a long dead Jedi in a crystal that she can’t access, but she knows of an alien queen who maybe can.  Said queen only receives people in public once a year, and the queen loves biological oddities.  A Jedi would certainly count, even if Luke isn’t a full Jedi.  Why would Luke go along with this?  Well, that Jedi master might be able to train Luke in the ways of the Force, and he does want that, and he does think Aphra maybe isn’t that bad.  Can the greedy archaeologist who doesn’t plan ahead and the naive idealistic farmboy get what they want?

Of course not.  That’s not how these stories work.  Fortunately, both Aphra and Luke have allies.  Han, Leia, and Sana figure out where the two went and follow without Chewbacca (the queen hates Wookiees for reasons that are eventually revealed) or the droids (both doing their own thing in other stories), but Aphra has some much more murderous droids and Wookiees with her that are just as interested in saving Aphra for less than honorable reasons.  The net result is both groups, last seen fighting each other, are now forced to work together to get themselves out of the title location, the Screaming Citadel.

Co-written by both series’ regulars Jason Aaron and Kieron Gillen put together a good story, forcing two groups that normally wouldn’t be working together into a common cause.  Aphra and Luke actually compliment each other in interesting ways as Leia learns to value the two men she frequently works with when she sees just how bad she could have it with other associates.  Overall, this one was a big deeper in terms of character than I might have expected, but given how many of the cast here were original creations, there’s a really good reason for that.  8.5 out of 10 bad desserts.

tomk74

Defender of the faith, contributing writer, debonair man-about-town.

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