Watson Reviews: Love, Simon

I wanted to see this one in the theater with my boys, but schedules never really lined up so we caught it on home video with a friend who compared it favorably to a John Hughes film.

WHAT IT’S ABOUT:

The Hughes comparison holds up. Love, Simon is smart comedy about a suburban, teenaged boy who is still in the closet. He begins an anonymous email relationship with another closeted member of his high school.

When Simon’s secret is threatened to be revealed, his ties to his closest friends are jeopardized.

As Simon tries to navigate his feelings, the audience gets to solve the mystery of just who his anonymous friend is!

WHAT WORKED:

  • There really is a little John Hughes in here. This film could have taken place in the same small town in Illinois that Hughes set his films. It is definitely a spiritual descendant of his work without being in any way derivative.
  • The kids are solid!  The film had a strong young cast led by Nick Robinson (Jurassic World), who plays the titular character.
  • The film really says something while still being a comedy. I love a film that can get a smart message across (here, the challenge of coming out it still there despite strides of tolerance) while still being funny and charming. Sometimes it gets a little after school special, but not here.

WHAT DIDN’T WORK:

  • There were some small moments of convenient plotting. Like any broad comedy, you have to turn off common sense to let things play out.
  • The timing of the falling action was a bit unrealistic. Not easy to talk about this without going into plot points, but the third act takes a long time playing out and conveniently times itself around Christmas break seemingly only to create drama.

FINAL THOUGHTS:

Very little not to like here. Love, Simon is a warm, funny, and entertaining. Good film recommended for everyone.

Overall, I give LOVE, SIMON 9.5 “Ferris Wheel Tickets” out of 10.

One thought on “Watson Reviews: Love, Simon

  1. You know what I really liked about this one? That the film itself didn’t make Simon’s sexual orientation out as if it were some special thing. Yes, he’s in the closet and worried, but most of the problem he has when he does come out are related to actions he took that had little to do with his actual orientation and more to do with trying to keep it under wraps. His being gay is only really a big deal to Simon himself.

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