Comic Review: Rat Queens Volume 4

Normally, this time slot is reserved for the “Westeros Watch” column, but Jimmy had an important mission South of the Wall, so here’s a comic review that is somewhat thematically similar since it’s another fantasy series.  No doubt we’ll be back in Westeros next week.  In the meantime…

There was some confusion about whether or not the Image Comics series Rat Queens would be able to continue after some real-world controversy involving the series’ original artist.

Fortunately, writer Kurtis J Wiebe found a new artist in the form of Owen Gieni to continue the comedic fantasy adventures of the four modern women in a fantasy setting.

Or, as of now, five women.  Hannah the cynical elf mage, Violet the hipster dwarf fighter, Dee the human atheist cleric, and Betty the hippie smidgen thief have a new member to the group in the form of Braga the transgendered orc warrior.  Braga fits in rather well with the group, all told, as they were a squabbling group of adventurers before, and they still are.  As it is, there was a time jump of some kind since the third volume, and while Weibe has promised that all the backstory will eventually be explained, for now there are a lot of weird things around the city-state of Palisade that include the decimation of the other adventuring teams save a lucky handful, a cult rising from the ashes of the attack, and Hannah back with the group after leaving them to explore her more demonic side at the end of the previous volume.  It’s that loss that allowed Braga to join as she had no one else to adventure with, and adventuring by oneself doesn’t pay the bills very well.

As a set-up for future stuff, volume four is off to a good enough start.  Weibe gives some insight to his characters and for the first time didn’t give the most screentime to Hannah and her origins.  Violet has problems when her twin brother Barrie shows up and sets up his own competing adventuring group for his own amusement, and Dee has some sort of mysterious past incidents to be worked through, but the story didn’t focus most of its energy on Hannah.  I rather like that.  Eight and a half out of ten mushroom people.

tomk74

Defender of the faith, contributing writer, debonair man-about-town.

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