The Wire “Misgivings”

I haven’t really said much of anything about the character of State Senator Clay Davis in any of the various Wire writings I’ve done.  I never quite knew how big a character he was in the grand scheme of things, and besides, The Wire has such a huge cast of characters that it can be easy to not know who will keep coming back and contributing to whatever’s going on.

By this point, viewers would know Davis is a snake-in-the-grass, as seen in this episode where he plays both sides while advising both Carcetti and Burrell in their respective conflicts with each other.  He’s not a very honest man, someone who’s been portrayed as an even bigger crook than any of the different drug lords the police are always looking to round up.  Episodes like this suggest that is not a wrong assumption.

Hey, you know what’s amazing?  Omar, by simply watching Marlo do business in his courtyard, has basically figured out the Co-Op exists all by himself.  Well, technically, his boyfriend is helping, but the cops haven’t gotten that far.

You know what else is amazing?  McNulty has been lying low this season, content to be a uniformed beat cop.  He’s acting like a mature man, drinking a whole lot less, and even his ex-wife seems surprised at him being a decent guy.  And then when Burrell pushes for more arrests, he shows his old detective instincts and gets a church robber instead of just rounding up people for misdemeanors like a lot of the other cops around him are doing.  That whole thing about arresting more people doesn’t sit well with Daniels, who makes a rare circumvention of the chain of command to talk to Carcetti personally.  That gives Davis and Burrell the impulse to look into Daniels’ past since it looks like Carcetti might like Daniels to replace Burrell.

But then there’s Bubbles.  Bubbles got beaten up because Herc is (surprise, surprise) unreliable.  Heck, Herc getting Bubbles a burner doesn’t help either if Herc is being chewed out by Marimow at the same time Bubbles calls.  What does Bubbles do?  Frame a minister and make a phony call to Herc.

One arrest that goes differently is Namond.  Carver busts him for dealing, but instead of going to juvie, Namond asks to be released to his teacher, Colvin.  Colvin has Namond over for dinner.  It’s a much more different relationship between the two from when they first sat down.  Sure, Namond’s absent mother doesn’t much like it, but she’s hardly mother of the year.

By the way, Bodie realizes Marlo is a much different guy to work for when an associate comes clean to Marlo about being taken in for questioning and the guy is killed.  Poor makes a good point about the world getting colder even as climate change is making it hotter.

But while all this is going on, Michael completes the transaction on his soul to Marlo.  First, he points out his step-father to Chris and Snoop.  He never really says why he wants the man gone, but Chris reads between the lines.  Whether he reads accurately or not I couldn’t say, but that night, Chris and Snoop get the guy, and Chris suggests the man might have molested Michael.  Did he?  That actually explains a lot about Michael.  As it is, the savage, fatal beating Chris gives the guy even gives Snoop pause, which is something because normally Snoop is the one more down with violence.

Point is, we started the season with three boys (four if you count Dukie).  Michael is drifting to a life of crime.  Namond might be finding a way out.

Besides, the opening scene showed that juvenile car thief taunting and then getting some fingers broken by that same crooked cop that robbed Bubbles.  I don’t know if anything will come of that, but I didn’t know if anything would come from Clay Davis either.

tomk74

Defender of the faith, contributing writer, debonair man-about-town.

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