Simpsons Did It!: “Homie The Clown”

In some of the series’ early planning, there was an idea that Homer Simpson would secretly be Krusty the Clown, and how Bart’s hero was also someone Bart had no respect for at home.  That idea was scrapped, but a variation on that idea occurred in this episode.

In the meantime, know we aren’t talking about this guy:

homie-the-clown

Krusty’s broke.  Maybe his spending habits are terrible, or maybe his betting habits are worse.  I mean, he bets on the opera.  I’m not sure what that means.  Anyhoo, one of Krusty’s accountants figures the only thing left to do is license a clown college to train regional Krustys.  The Lady Krusty shavers advertised by Johnny Unitas sure weren’t doing it.

As always, Homer turns out to be susceptible to bad ideas, and enrolls almost immediately, despite claims the billboard had no effect on him whatsoever.  Maybe seeing circus clowns everywhere sealed the deal.

Homer does graduate, and without too much hassle outside his efforts to avoid an electric shock from Krusty’s joy buzzer.  Now Homer can do all the little things Krusty has no time for, like opening a new Krustyburger, children’s birthday parties, and co-hosting award shows with Dick Cavett.  He hates all those things, even the part where he maybe almost beats a little person to death.

Meanwhile, the real Krusty made another bad bet with the Springfield mafia by betting against the Harlem Globetrotters.  Fat Tony (returning voice Joe Mantegna!) wants the money, but when Krusty slips away, he’ll go find the first Krusty he can to pay the debt, possibly with his life.

That’d be about the time Homer discovered that being Krusty gets you free stuff.  And when Ned Flanders learns how the Bible and the True Cross really save.

Fortunately, Krusty goes back before Homer gets drilled, and the elderly mob boss who will even admit he’s an Italian stereotype agrees to let Krusty live if he and Homer can do a trick through a hoop involving a tiny bicycle.  They do, and Krusty can live but he has to pay his debt.

Which was $48.

Oy.

John Swartzwelder wrote this one, too, and we learned one little fact:  Milhouse’s father works at a cracker factory.

Someone has to work at the cracker factory.

tomk74

Defender of the faith, contributing writer, debonair man-about-town.

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